Difference between revisions of "Workshops and Classes"

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== University of Washington Courses ==
 
== University of Washington Courses ==
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* '''[Winter 2021]''' '''[[Statistics and Statistical Programming (Winter 2021)|COM520: Statistical Methods in Communication]]''' — A quarter-long quantitative methods course that builds a first-quarter introduction to quantitative methodology and that focuses on both the more mathematical elements of statistics as well as the nuts-and-bolts of statistical programming in the GNU R programming language. Taught by [[User:Mako|Benjamin Mako Hill]].
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* '''[Winter 2021]''' '''[[Interpersonal Media (Winter 2021)|COM482: Interpersonal Media: Online Communities]]''' —  A course on online communities and computer mediated communication with an emphasis on learning from research in social psychology, sociology, and behavioral economics taught by [[User:Groceryheist|Nathan TeBlunthuis]].
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* '''[Winter 2021]''' '''[[Directed Research Group: The COVID-19 Information Landscape (Winter 2021)]]''' — A directed research group studying our response to the Coronavirus/Covid-19 pandemic.
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* '''[Fall 2020]''' '''[[Interpersonal Media (Fall 2020)|COM482: Interpersonal Media: Online Communities]]''' —  A course on online communities and computer mediated communication with an emphasis on learning from research in social psychology, sociology, and behavioral economics taught by [[User:Benjamin Mako Hill|Benjamin Mako Hill]].
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* '''[Fall 2020]''' '''[[Directed Research Group: The COVID-19 Information Landscape (Fall 2020)]]''' -- A directed research group considering responses to the Covid-19 pandemic. Students will learn to conduct thematic analysis and content analysis on search engine results. (Appears as COM 499)
  
 
* '''[Winter 2020]''' '''[[Interpersonal Media (Winter 2020)|COM482: Interpersonal Media: Online Communities]]''' —  A course on online communities and computer mediated communication with an emphasis on learning from research in social psychology, sociology, and behavioral economics taught by [[User:Benjamin Mako Hill|Benjamin Mako Hill]].
 
* '''[Winter 2020]''' '''[[Interpersonal Media (Winter 2020)|COM482: Interpersonal Media: Online Communities]]''' —  A course on online communities and computer mediated communication with an emphasis on learning from research in social psychology, sociology, and behavioral economics taught by [[User:Benjamin Mako Hill|Benjamin Mako Hill]].
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== Northwestern Courses & Workshop ==
 
== Northwestern Courses & Workshop ==
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* '''[Fall 2020]''' '''[[Statistics_and_Statistical_Programming_(Fall_2020)| MTS 525 / COMM_ST 395: Statistics and Statistical Computing]]''' — This course provides a get-your-hands-dirty introduction to inferential statistics and statistical programming mostly for applications in the social sciences and social computing. My main objectives are for all participants to acquire the conceptual, technical, and practical skills to conduct your own statistical analyses and become more sophisticated consumers of quantitative research in communication, human computer interaction (HCI), and adjacent disciplines.
  
 
* '''[Winter 2020]''' '''[https://docs.google.com/document/d/11NBkZS3w8Fp5YSHo71TQuykJ1Z6lfqbo1AW5GV2hRGk/edit?usp=sharing History and Theory of Information]''' — We live in an information age, with computers of unprecedented power in our pockets. This course seeks to understand how information shapes our lives today, and how it has in the past. It does so via an interdisciplinary inquiry into four technological infrastructures of information and communication—print, wires, airwaves, and bits. Co-taught by [[User:Aaronshaw|Aaron Shaw]] and [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Immerwahr Daniel Immerwahr].
 
* '''[Winter 2020]''' '''[https://docs.google.com/document/d/11NBkZS3w8Fp5YSHo71TQuykJ1Z6lfqbo1AW5GV2hRGk/edit?usp=sharing History and Theory of Information]''' — We live in an information age, with computers of unprecedented power in our pockets. This course seeks to understand how information shapes our lives today, and how it has in the past. It does so via an interdisciplinary inquiry into four technological infrastructures of information and communication—print, wires, airwaves, and bits. Co-taught by [[User:Aaronshaw|Aaron Shaw]] and [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Immerwahr Daniel Immerwahr].
  
* '''[Spring 2019]''' '''[[Statistics and Statistical Programming (Spring 2019)| MTS525: Statistics and Statistical Programming]]''' — A quarter-long quantitative methods course that builds a first-quarter introduction to quantitative methodology and that focuses on both the more mathematical elements of statistics as well as the nuts-and-bolts of statistical programming in the GNU R programming language. Taught by [[User:Aaronshaw|Aaron Shaw]].
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* '''[Spring 2019]''' '''[[Statistics and Statistical Programming (Spring 2019)| MTS525: Statistics and Statistical Programming]]''' — A quarter-long graduate-level quantitative methods course that focuses on both the foundations for inferential statistics as well as the nuts-and-bolts of statistical programming in the GNU R programming language. Taught by [[User:Aaronshaw|Aaron Shaw]].
  
 
* '''[Spring 2019]''' '''[[Practice_of_scholarship_(Spring_2019)|The Practice of Scholarship (MTS 503, Spring 2019)]]''' — The second of two required seminars in the Media, Technology & Society (MTS) and Technology and Social Behavior (TSB) programs, the goal for this course is simple: submit a piece of academic research for publication by the end of the quarter. The course and assignments are structured to help students cultivate (more of) the skills, wisdom, and experience necessary to publish independent, original, and high-quality scholarship in relevant venues for their work. The experience will probably feel like a combination of a writing bootcamp and an extended group therapy session.
 
* '''[Spring 2019]''' '''[[Practice_of_scholarship_(Spring_2019)|The Practice of Scholarship (MTS 503, Spring 2019)]]''' — The second of two required seminars in the Media, Technology & Society (MTS) and Technology and Social Behavior (TSB) programs, the goal for this course is simple: submit a piece of academic research for publication by the end of the quarter. The course and assignments are structured to help students cultivate (more of) the skills, wisdom, and experience necessary to publish independent, original, and high-quality scholarship in relevant venues for their work. The experience will probably feel like a combination of a writing bootcamp and an extended group therapy session.
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== Purdue University Courses ==
 
== Purdue University Courses ==
  
[[Intro_to_Programming_and_Data_Science_(Spring_2020)|Intro to Programming and Data Science (COM 67400, Spring 2020)]] — A graduate level course intended to provide an introduction to programming and computational analysis of text in Python. The course is designed for social scientists, especially those seeking to gather data from the Web.
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* '''[Spring 2021]''' '''[[Data Into Insights (Spring 2021)|Turning Data into Insight and Stories (COM 495/6/7, Spring 2021)]]'''
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* '''[Spring 2021]''' '''[[Communication and Social Networks (Spring 2021)|Communication and Social Networks (COM 411, Spring 2021)]]'''
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* '''[Summer 2020]''' '''[[Intro_to_Programming_and_Data_Science_(Summer_2020)|Intro to Programming and Data Science (COM 67400, Summer 2020)]]''' — An intense, four-week version of the graduate level course intended to provide an introduction to programming and computational analysis of text in Python. The course is designed for social scientists, especially those seeking to gather data from the Web. These courses borrow heavily from the Community Data Science Workshops and courses.
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* '''[Spring 2020]''' '''[[Intro_to_Programming_and_Data_Science_(Spring_2020)|Intro to Programming and Data Science (COM 67400, Spring 2020)]]''' — A graduate level course intended to provide an introduction to programming and computational analysis of text in Python. The course is designed for social scientists, especially those seeking to gather data from the Web.
  
[[Communication_and_Social_Networks_(Spring_2020)|Communication and Social Networks (COM 411, Spring 2020)]] — This course is designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of social network analysis. My version of the course introduced the programming language <code>R</code> and visualizing and analyzing networks using the [https://igraph.org/r/ igraph library].
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* '''[Spring 2020]''' '''[[Communication_and_Social_Networks_(Spring_2020)|Communication and Social Networks (COM 411, Spring 2020)]]''' — This course is designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of social network analysis. My version of the course introduced the programming language <code>R</code> and visualizing and analyzing networks using the [https://igraph.org/r/ igraph library].

Revision as of 01:54, 3 January 2021

Public Workshops

Community Data Science Workshops — The Community Data Science Workshops (CDSW) are a series of workshops designed to introduce some of the basic tools of programming and analysis of data from online communities to absolute beginners. The CDSW have been held four times in Seattle in 2014 and 2015. So far, more than 80 people have volunteered their weekends to teach more than 350 people to program in Python, to build datasets from Web APIs, and to ask and answer questions using these data.

University of Washington Courses

  • [Winter 2021] COM520: Statistical Methods in Communication — A quarter-long quantitative methods course that builds a first-quarter introduction to quantitative methodology and that focuses on both the more mathematical elements of statistics as well as the nuts-and-bolts of statistical programming in the GNU R programming language. Taught by Benjamin Mako Hill.
  • [Fall 2017] DATA512: Human Centered Data Science — Fundamental principles of data science and its human implications. Data ethics; data privacy; differential privacy; algorithmic bias; legal frameworks and intellectual property; provenance and reproducibility; data curation and preservation; user experience design and usability testing for big data; ethics of crowdwork; data communication; and societal impacts of data science.
  • [Winter 2017] COM521: Statistics and Statistical Programming — A quarter-long quantitative methods course that builds a first-quarter introduction to quantitative methodology and that focuses on both the more mathematical elements of statistics as well as the nuts-and-bolts of statistical programming in the GNU R programming language. Taught by Benjamin Mako Hill.

Northwestern Courses & Workshop

  • [Fall 2020] MTS 525 / COMM_ST 395: Statistics and Statistical Computing — This course provides a get-your-hands-dirty introduction to inferential statistics and statistical programming mostly for applications in the social sciences and social computing. My main objectives are for all participants to acquire the conceptual, technical, and practical skills to conduct your own statistical analyses and become more sophisticated consumers of quantitative research in communication, human computer interaction (HCI), and adjacent disciplines.
  • [Winter 2020] History and Theory of Information — We live in an information age, with computers of unprecedented power in our pockets. This course seeks to understand how information shapes our lives today, and how it has in the past. It does so via an interdisciplinary inquiry into four technological infrastructures of information and communication—print, wires, airwaves, and bits. Co-taught by Aaron Shaw and Daniel Immerwahr.
  • [Spring 2019] MTS525: Statistics and Statistical Programming — A quarter-long graduate-level quantitative methods course that focuses on both the foundations for inferential statistics as well as the nuts-and-bolts of statistical programming in the GNU R programming language. Taught by Aaron Shaw.
  • [Spring 2019] The Practice of Scholarship (MTS 503, Spring 2019) — The second of two required seminars in the Media, Technology & Society (MTS) and Technology and Social Behavior (TSB) programs, the goal for this course is simple: submit a piece of academic research for publication by the end of the quarter. The course and assignments are structured to help students cultivate (more of) the skills, wisdom, and experience necessary to publish independent, original, and high-quality scholarship in relevant venues for their work. The experience will probably feel like a combination of a writing bootcamp and an extended group therapy session.
  • Online Communities & Crowds (COMMST 378, Fall 2016) — This advanced undergraduate course presents an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of online communities and crowds, with a particular emphasis on how and why some of these systems are so wildly effective at mobilizing and organizing people in ways that seem to have been impossible a few decades ago.
  • Introduction to Graduate Research (MTS 501, Fall 2016) — The first of two required seminars in the Media, Technology & Society (MTS) and Technology and Social Behavior (TSB) programs, this course introduces first year Ph.D. students to research skills and gives guidance on how to be a productive and responsible scholar.
  • The Practice of Scholarship (MTS 503, Spring 2016) — The second of two required seminars in the Media, Technology & Society (MTS) and Technology and Social Behavior (TSB) programs, the goal for this course is simple: submit a piece of academic research for publication by the end of the quarter. The course and assignments are structured to help students cultivate (more of) the skills, wisdom, and experience necessary to publish independent, original, and high-quality scholarship in relevant venues for their work. The experience will probably feel like a combination of a writing bootcamp and an extended group therapy session.

Purdue University Courses

  • [Summer 2020] Intro to Programming and Data Science (COM 67400, Summer 2020) — An intense, four-week version of the graduate level course intended to provide an introduction to programming and computational analysis of text in Python. The course is designed for social scientists, especially those seeking to gather data from the Web. These courses borrow heavily from the Community Data Science Workshops and courses.