Editing Internet Research Methods (Winter 2020)

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* Describe particular challenges and threats to research validity associated with each method.
 
* Describe particular challenges and threats to research validity associated with each method.
 
* For at least one method, be able to provide a detailed description of a research project and feel comfortable embarking on a formative study using this methodology.
 
* For at least one method, be able to provide a detailed description of a research project and feel comfortable embarking on a formative study using this methodology.
* Given a manuscript (e.g., in the context of a request for peer review), be able to evaluate an Internet-based study in terms of its use its methodological choices.
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* Given a manuscript (e.g., in the context of a request for peer review), be able to evaluate a Internet-based study in terms of its use its methodological choices.
 
* Use a modern programming language (like Python) to collect a dataset from a web API like those published by Twitter, Reddit, or Wikipedia.
 
* Use a modern programming language (like Python) to collect a dataset from a web API like those published by Twitter, Reddit, or Wikipedia.
  
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* boyd, danah. 2015. “Making Sense of Teen Life: Strategies for Capturing Ethnographic Data in a Networked Era.” In Digital Research Confidential: The Secrets of Studying Behavior Online, edited by Eszter Hargittai and Christian Sandvig. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ''[[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/61411386/download?download_frd=1 Available in Canvas]]''
 
* boyd, danah. 2015. “Making Sense of Teen Life: Strategies for Capturing Ethnographic Data in a Networked Era.” In Digital Research Confidential: The Secrets of Studying Behavior Online, edited by Eszter Hargittai and Christian Sandvig. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ''[[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/61411386/download?download_frd=1 Available in Canvas]]''
: Note: Strongly focused on ethnographic interviews with tons of very specific details. Fantastic article on interviewing, although perhaps a bit weak on Internet-specific advice.
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: Note: Strongly focused on enthnographic interviews with tons of very specific details. Fantastic article on interviewing, although perhaps a bit weak on Internet specific advice.
 
* Markham, Annette N. 1998. “The Shifting Project, The Shifting Self.” In Life Online: Researching Real Experience in Virtual Space, 61–83. Rowman Altamira. ''[Available from instructor]''
 
* Markham, Annette N. 1998. “The Shifting Project, The Shifting Self.” In Life Online: Researching Real Experience in Virtual Space, 61–83. Rowman Altamira. ''[Available from instructor]''
 
: Note: One of the earliest books on online life and one of the earliest attempts to do online interviewing. This is dated, but highlight some important challenge.
 
: Note: One of the earliest books on online life and one of the earliest attempts to do online interviewing. This is dated, but highlight some important challenge.
* Hutchinson, Emma. 2016. “Digital Methods and Perpetual Reinvention? Asynchronous Interviewing and Photo Elicitation.” In Digital Methods for Social Science: An Interdisciplinary Guide to Research Innovation, edited by Helene Snee, Christine Hine, Yvette Morey, Steven Roberts, and Hayley Watson, 143–56. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137453662_9. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137453662_9 Available through UW Libraries]]''
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* Hutchinson, Emma. 2016. “Digital Methods and Perpetual Reinvention? Asynchronous Interviewing and Photo Elicitation.” In Digital Methods for Social Science: An Interdisciplinary Guide to Research Innovation, edited by Helene Snee, Christine Hine, Yvette Morey, Steven Roberts, and Hayley Watson, 143–56. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137453662_9. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137453662_9 Available through UW libraries]]''
 
* Hawkins, Janice. 2018. “The Practical Utility and Suitability of Email Interviews in Qualitative Research.” The Qualitative Report 23 (2). https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/nursing_fac_pubs/24. ''[[https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/nursing_fac_pubs/24 Available free online]]''
 
* Hawkins, Janice. 2018. “The Practical Utility and Suitability of Email Interviews in Qualitative Research.” The Qualitative Report 23 (2). https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/nursing_fac_pubs/24. ''[[https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/nursing_fac_pubs/24 Available free online]]''
  
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=== Week 4: Saturday February 1: CDSW Session 2 ===
 
=== Week 4: Saturday February 1: CDSW Session 2 ===
  
As described in the section on technical skills above, I expect everybody who is not comfortable with at least basic programming and data collection to attend the [[Community Data Science Workshops (Winter 2020)]] which I am running concurrently with this class.
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As description in the section on technical skills above, I expect everybody who is not comfortable with at least basic programming and data collection to attend the [[Community Data Science Workshops (Winter 2020)]] which I am running concurrently with this class.
  
This session will run from 10 am-4 pm. Details on the [[CDSW Winter 2020]] page.
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This session will run from 10am-4pm. Details on the [[CDSW Winter 2020]] page.
  
 
=== Week 5: Tuesday February 4: (I) Surveys and (II) Experiments ===
 
=== Week 5: Tuesday February 4: (I) Surveys and (II) Experiments ===
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'''Required Readings:'''
 
'''Required Readings:'''
  
* Reips, Ulf-Dietrich. 2002. “Standards for Internet-Based Experimenting.” Experimental Psychology 49 (4): 243–56. https://doi.org/10.1026//1618-3169.49.4.243. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1026//1618-3169.49.4.243 Available through UW Libraries]]'
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* Reips, Ulf-Dietrich. 2002. “Standards for Internet-Based Experimenting.” Experimental Psychology 49 (4): 243–56. https://doi.org/10.1026//1618-3169.49.4.243. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1026//1618-3169.49.4.243 Available through UW libraries]]'
* Salganik, Matthew J., Peter Sheridan Dodds, and Duncan J. Watts. 2006. “Experimental Study of Inequality and Unpredictability in an Artificial Cultural Market.” Science 311 (5762): 854–56. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1121066. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1121066 Available through UW Libraries]]'
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* Salganik, Matthew J., Peter Sheridan Dodds, and Duncan J. Watts. 2006. “Experimental Study of Inequality and Unpredictability in an Artificial Cultural Market.” Science 311 (5762): 854–56. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1121066. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1121066 Available through UW libraries]]'
 
* Hergueux, Jérôme, and Nicolas Jacquemet. 2014. “Social Preferences in the Online Laboratory: A Randomized Experiment.” Experimental Economics 18 (2): 251–83. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10683-014-9400-5. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1007/s10683-014-9400-5 Available in Canvas]]''
 
* Hergueux, Jérôme, and Nicolas Jacquemet. 2014. “Social Preferences in the Online Laboratory: A Randomized Experiment.” Experimental Economics 18 (2): 251–83. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10683-014-9400-5. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1007/s10683-014-9400-5 Available in Canvas]]''
 
* Rijt, Arnout van de, Soong Moon Kang, Michael Restivo, and Akshay Patil. 2014. “Field Experiments of Success-Breeds-Success Dynamics.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (19): 6934–39. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1316836111. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1316836111 Available in Canvas]]''
 
* Rijt, Arnout van de, Soong Moon Kang, Michael Restivo, and Akshay Patil. 2014. “Field Experiments of Success-Breeds-Success Dynamics.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (19): 6934–39. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1316836111. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1316836111 Available in Canvas]]''
* Narayan, Sneha, Nathan TeBlunthuis, Wm Salt Hale, Benjamin Mako Hill, and Aaron Shaw. 2019. “All Talk: How Increasing Interpersonal Communication on Wikis May Not Enhance Productivity.” Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 3 (CSCW): 101:1–101:19. https://doi.org/10.1145/3359203. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1145/3359203 Available through UW Libraries]]'
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* Narayan, Sneha, Nathan TeBlunthuis, Wm Salt Hale, Benjamin Mako Hill, and Aaron Shaw. 2019. “All Talk: How Increasing Interpersonal Communication on Wikis May Not Enhance Productivity.” Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction 3 (CSCW): 101:1–101:19. https://doi.org/10.1145/3359203. ''[[https://doi.org/10.1145/3359203 Available through UW libraries]]'
  
 
'''Optional Readings:'''
 
'''Optional Readings:'''
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The first task is to complete a task a crowd worker:
 
The first task is to complete a task a crowd worker:
  
* '''If you are a US citizen:''' Sign up as a worker on MTurk. Find and complete at least 5 "hits" as a worker on [http://mturk.com Amazon Mechanical Turk]. Note that to do this you will need to create a ''worker'' account on Mturk.
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* '''If you are a US citizen:''' Sign up as a worker on MTurk. Find and complete at least 5 "hits" as a worker on [http://mturk.com Amazon Mechnical Turk]. Note that to do this you will need to create a ''worker'' account on Mturk.
* '''If you are not a US citizen or if you cannot sign up on MTurk for some other reason:''' Complete at least 3-4 classification tasks in at least 2 different [https://www.zooniverse.org/projects Zooniverse projects] of your choice. Also, complete at least one "study" in [https://www.labinthewild.org/ Lab in the Wild]  
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* '''If you are not a US citizen or if you cannot sign up on MTurk for some other reason:''' Complete at least 3-4 classification tasks in at least 2 different [https://www.zooniverse.org/projects Zooniverse projects] of your choice. Also complete at least one "study" in [https://www.labinthewild.org/ Lab in the Wild]  
 
* In either case: Record (write down) details and notes about your tasks: What did you do? Who was the requester? What could you was the purpose of the task (as best you could tell)? What was the experience like? What research applications can you (not) imagine for this kind of system?  
 
* In either case: Record (write down) details and notes about your tasks: What did you do? Who was the requester? What could you was the purpose of the task (as best you could tell)? What was the experience like? What research applications can you (not) imagine for this kind of system?  
  
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* Faulkner, Simon, Farida Vis, and Francesco D’Orazio. 2018. “Analysing Social Media Images.” In The SAGE Handbook of Social Media, edited by Jean Burgess, Alice Marwick, and Thomas Poell, 160–78. London, UK: SAGE. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781473984066. {{avail-uw|https://doi.org/10.4135/9781473984066}}
 
* Faulkner, Simon, Farida Vis, and Francesco D’Orazio. 2018. “Analysing Social Media Images.” In The SAGE Handbook of Social Media, edited by Jean Burgess, Alice Marwick, and Thomas Poell, 160–78. London, UK: SAGE. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781473984066. {{avail-uw|https://doi.org/10.4135/9781473984066}}
 
* Casas, Andreu, and Nora Webb Williams. 2019. “Images That Matter: Online Protests and the Mobilizing Role of Pictures.” Political Research Quarterly 72 (2): 360–75. https://doi.org/10.1177/1065912918786805. {{avail-uw|https://doi.org/10.1177/1065912918786805}}
 
* Casas, Andreu, and Nora Webb Williams. 2019. “Images That Matter: Online Protests and the Mobilizing Role of Pictures.” Political Research Quarterly 72 (2): 360–75. https://doi.org/10.1177/1065912918786805. {{avail-uw|https://doi.org/10.1177/1065912918786805}}
* Casas, Andreu, and Nora Webb Williams. 2017. “Computer Vision for Political Science Research: A Study of Online Protest Images.” In. College Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University. http://andreucasas.com/casas_webb_williams_NewFaces2017_images_as_data.pdf. {{avail-free|http://andreucasas.com/casas_webb_williams_NewFaces2017_images_as_data.pdf}}
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* Casas, Andreu, and Nora Webb Williams. 2017. “Computer Vision for Political Science Research: A Study of Online Protest Images.” In . College Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University. http://andreucasas.com/casas_webb_williams_NewFaces2017_images_as_data.pdf. {{avail-free|http://andreucasas.com/casas_webb_williams_NewFaces2017_images_as_data.pdf}}
* Hochman, Nadav, and Raz Schwartz. 2012. “Visualizing Instagram: Tracing Cultural Visual Rhythms.” In Sixth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/780d/c7ff86eb36731d5faa043ac635cbae6bbe45.pdf. {{avail-free|https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/780d/c7ff86eb36731d5faa043ac635cbae6bbe45.pdf}}
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* Hochman, Nadav, and Raz Schwartz. 2012. “Visualizing Instagram: Tracing Cultural Visual Rhythms.” In Sixth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media. http://www.aaai.org/ocs/index.php/ICWSM/ICWSM12/paper/view/4782. {{avail-free|http://www.aaai.org/ocs/index.php/ICWSM/ICWSM12/paper/view/4782}}
  
 
'''Optional Readings:'''
 
'''Optional Readings:'''
  
 
* Torralba, Antonio. 2009. “Understanding Visual Scenes.” Tutorial presented at the NIPS, Vancouver, BC, Canada. http://videolectures.net/nips09_torralba_uvs/. {{avail-uw|http://videolectures.net/nips09_torralba_uvs/}}
 
* Torralba, Antonio. 2009. “Understanding Visual Scenes.” Tutorial presented at the NIPS, Vancouver, BC, Canada. http://videolectures.net/nips09_torralba_uvs/. {{avail-uw|http://videolectures.net/nips09_torralba_uvs/}}
: Note: This is a two-part (each part is one hour) lecture and tutorial by an expert in computer vision. I strongly recommend watching Part I. I think this gives you a good sense of the nature of the kinds of challenges that were (and still are) facing the field of computer vision and anybody trying to have their computer look at images.
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: Note: This is a two part (each part is one hour) lecture and tutorial by a expert in computer vision. I strongly recommend watching Part I. I think this gives you a good sense of the nature of the kinds of challenges that were (and still are) facing the field of computer vision and anybody trying to have their computer look at images.
 
* Hochman, Nadav, and Lev Manovich. 2013. “Zooming into an Instagram City: Reading the Local through Social Media.” First Monday 18 (7). https://firstmonday.org/article/view/4711/3698. {{avail-free|https://firstmonday.org/article/view/4711/3698}}
 
* Hochman, Nadav, and Lev Manovich. 2013. “Zooming into an Instagram City: Reading the Local through Social Media.” First Monday 18 (7). https://firstmonday.org/article/view/4711/3698. {{avail-free|https://firstmonday.org/article/view/4711/3698}}
  
These five papers are all technical approaches to doing image classification using datasets from Internet-based datasets of images like Flickr, Google Image Search, Google Street View, or Instagram. Each of these describes interesting and challenges technical issues. If you're interested, it would be a great idea to read these to get a sense for the state of the art and what is and isn't possible:
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These five paper are all technical approaches to doing image classification using datasets from Internet-based datasets of images like Flickr, Google Image Search, Google Street View, or Instagram. Each of these describes interesting and challenges technical issues. If you're interested, it would be a great idea to read these to get a sense for the state of the art and what is and isn't possible:
  
 
* Jaffe, Alexandar, Mor Naaman, Tamir Tassa, and Marc Davis. 2006. “Generating Summaries and Visualization for Large Collections of Geo-Referenced Photographs.” In Proceedings of the 8th ACM International Workshop on Multimedia Information Retrieval, 89–98. MIR ’06. New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1178677.1178692. {{avail-uw|https://doi.org/10.1145/1178677.1178692}}
 
* Jaffe, Alexandar, Mor Naaman, Tamir Tassa, and Marc Davis. 2006. “Generating Summaries and Visualization for Large Collections of Geo-Referenced Photographs.” In Proceedings of the 8th ACM International Workshop on Multimedia Information Retrieval, 89–98. MIR ’06. New York, NY, USA: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1178677.1178692. {{avail-uw|https://doi.org/10.1145/1178677.1178692}}
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=== Week 9: Tuesday March 3: Consulting Week ===
 
=== Week 9: Tuesday March 3: Consulting Week ===
  
During this week, we will not meet together. Instead, I will schedule one-on-one in-person meetings of an hour with each student individually to catch up with you about your project and to work directly with you to resolve any technical issues you have run into with data collected.
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During this week, we not meet together. Instead, I will schedule one-on-one in person meetings of an hour with each student individually to catch up with you about your project and to work directly with you to resolve any technical issues you have run into with data collect.
  
 
=== Week 10: Tuesday March 10: Final Presentations  ===
 
=== Week 10: Tuesday March 10: Final Presentations  ===
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==== Part I: Design Research ====
 
==== Part I: Design Research ====
Today we'll have a guest visitor — [http://www.andresmh.com/ Andrés Monroy-Hernández] who is director of HCI research at SNAP and formerly from [http://fuse.microsoft.com/ Microsoft Research's FUSE labs]. Andrés is affiliate faculty in the Department of Communication and Department of Human-Centered Design and Engineering at UW. Monroy-Hernández's research involves studying people by designing and building systems. He's built a number of very large and successful socio-technical systems as part of his research. In his graduate work, he build the [http://scratch.mit.edu/ Scratch Online Community] which is now used by more than 10 million people.
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Today we'll have a guest visitor — [http://www.andresmh.com/ Andrés Monroy-Hernández] who is director of HCI research at SNAP and formerly from [http://fuse.microsoft.com/ Microsoft Resarch's FUSE labs]. Andrés is affiliate faculty in the Department of Communication and Department of Human-Centered Design and Engineering at UW. Monroy-Hernández research involves studying people by designing and building systems. He's built a number of very large and successful socio-technical systems as part of his research. In his graduate work, he build the [http://scratch.mit.edu/ Scratch Online Community] which is now used by more than 10 million people.
  
 
I've asked him to come and talk to us about design research as a process. As a result, it will be helpful to read about two projects he has worked on recently that he will talked to us about. Those projects are called NewsPad and Eventful.
 
I've asked him to come and talk to us about design research as a process. As a result, it will be helpful to read about two projects he has worked on recently that he will talked to us about. Those projects are called NewsPad and Eventful.
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* Eagle, Nathan, "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870285/download?download_frd=1 Mobile phones as sensors for social research]," Ch. 22 in HET.
 
* Eagle, Nathan, "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870285/download?download_frd=1 Mobile phones as sensors for social research]," Ch. 22 in HET.
* Visser, Albertine, and Ingrid Mulder, "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870283/download?download_frd=1 Emergent technologies for assessing social feelings and experiences]," Ch. 16 in HET.
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* Visser, Albertine and Ingrid Mulder, "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870283/download?download_frd=1 Emergent technologies for assessing social feelings and experiences]," Ch. 16 in HET.
 
* de Haan, Geert, et. al., "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870284/download?download_frd=1 Bringing the research lab into everyday life: Exploiting sensitive environments to acquire data for social research]," Ch. 23 in HET.
 
* de Haan, Geert, et. al., "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870284/download?download_frd=1 Bringing the research lab into everyday life: Exploiting sensitive environments to acquire data for social research]," Ch. 23 in HET.
 
* Fowler, Chris, et. al., "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870282/download?download_frd=1 Living laboratories: Social research applications and evaluations]," Ch. 27 in HET.
 
* Fowler, Chris, et. al., "[https://canvas.uw.edu/files/36870282/download?download_frd=1 Living laboratories: Social research applications and evaluations]," Ch. 27 in HET.
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=== Office Hours ===
 
=== Office Hours ===
  
I will hold office hours on '''Thursdays 1-2 pm ''' in [https://uw.edu/maps/?cmu Communications (CMU) 333]. In addition to my scheduled office hours, I am generally in [[Community Data Science Lab (UW)|my lab in CMU 306]]. Feel free to stop by at any time or to contact me to arrange a time to meet.
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I will hold office Hours on '''Thursdays 1-2pm''' in [https://uw.edu/maps/?cmu Communications (CMU) 333]. In addition to my scheduled office hours, I am generally in [[Community Data Science Lab (UW)|my lab in CMU 306]]. Feel free to stop by at any time or to contact me to arrange a time to meet.
  
 
=== Religious Accommodations ===
 
=== Religious Accommodations ===
  
Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for the accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at [https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/ Religious Accommodations Policy]. Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the [https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/ Religious Accommodations Request form].
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Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at [https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/ Religious Accommodations Policy]. Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the [https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/ Religious Accommodations Request form].
  
 
=== Student Conduct ===
 
=== Student Conduct ===
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Safety
 
Safety
  
Call SafeCampus at 206-685-7233 anytime–no matter where you work or study–to anonymously discuss safety and well-being concerns for yourself or others. SafeCampus’s team of caring professionals will provide individualized support while discussing short- and long-term solutions and connecting you with additional resources when requested.
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Call SafeCampus at 206-685-7233 anytime–no matter where you work or study–to anonymously discuss safety and well-being concerns for yourself or others. SafeCampus’s team of caring professionals will provide individualized support, while discussing short- and long-term solutions and connecting you with additional resources when requested.
  
 
=== Academic Dishonesty ===
 
=== Academic Dishonesty ===
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=== Disability Resources ===
 
=== Disability Resources ===
  
If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to UW at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.
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If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to uw at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.
  
 
If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions. Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS. It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.
 
If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions. Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS. It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.
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== Credit and Notes ==
 
== Credit and Notes ==
  
This will be the third time I have taught this course at UW in its current form. This syllabus draws heavily from previous versions. Syllabuses from earlier classes can be found online at:
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This will be third time I have taught this course at UW in its current form. This syllabuses draws heavily from previous versions. Syllabuses from earlier classes can be found online at:
  
 
* [[Internet Research Methods (Spring 2016)]]
 
* [[Internet Research Methods (Spring 2016)]]
 
* [https://mako.cc/teaching/2015/internet_research/ Internet Research Methods (Spring 2015)]
 
* [https://mako.cc/teaching/2015/internet_research/ Internet Research Methods (Spring 2015)]
  
This syllabus was inspired by and borrows with permission from, a syllabus from an earlier version of this class taught by [http://www.com.washington.edu/foot/ Kirsten Foot]. Professor Foot last taught the course in Spring 2014.
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This syllabus was inspired by, and borrows with permission from, a syallbus from an earlier version of this class taught by [http://www.com.washington.edu/foot/ Kirsten Foot]. Professor Foot last taught the course in Spring 2014.

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